OPL Spotlight: A Love of Nature Sparked a Focus on Sustainability for Yvonne Dwyer

OPL Spotlight: A Love of Nature Sparked a Focus on Sustainability for Yvonne Dwyer

“It’s not something I have to force” is how Yvonne Dwyer describes her focus on sustainability.

 

For Yvonne Dwyer, sustainability has become an extension of a lifestyle immersed in nature. As a Master Naturalist and writer for One Planet Life, Dwyer places particular importance on sharing how the natural world can enrich our lives.

“This is stuff that I’ve been interested in my entire life,” she said. “I can remember back to when I was five, six years old, creating my own fort out of bifold doors in the woods.”

While working for REI, Dwyer found joy in having an outlet to share her love of the outdoors. When the Pittsburgh store where she was employed closed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, it was time to reinvent herself. Lorie Buckingham, a lifelong friend of Dwyer, asked if she would like to write for her new sustainability-focused website, One Planet Life.

“I was applying for the Pennsylvania Master Naturalist program, so it seemed to be a good fit,” she said. “It makes us more credible to people than just sharing information. We are doing the things that we’re talking about. It’s important to be authentic and genuine in whatever you do.”

And it’s easy to see that Dwyer carries that authenticity into her work.

Sharing the Good News About Nature

As a naturalist, Dwyer aims to create stories that inspire positive messages. Getting out into nature is her best method.

“There’s research now where doctors are prescribing nature instead of medicine; that’s so wonderful,” she said. “Taking in the woods, the smell of the Balsam. You can’t recreate that. You’re using all of your senses.”

Enjoying the journey – not just the destination – when taking a walk in nature can be one of the best ways to encourage sustainable living because you’re experiencing the beauty at stake. 

“People go from point A to point B, or I’ll say point A to point C and totally miss what’s happening in point B – the journey,” she said. “The red newt salamander you might see on the ground or a mushroom – there’s always something unusual happening in the woods, no matter what time of year you’re going there. It doesn’t have to be in the woods; you can be in a city park or your neighborhood.”

Yvonne on a hike
Dwyer encourages a “big picture” perspective to get the most out of outdoor adventures.

“The big picture for me is to use all of my senses, create a story, and inspire others to go out and take it all in,” she said. “Just to go out and explore and see what happens. See what your senses pick up.” 

She’s also found inspiration in the naturalists who have come before her, women like Robin Wall Kimmerer and Anne LaBastille.

“Women like that inspire me,” she said. “It’s not that John Muir and [Ralph Waldo] Emerson and [Aldo] Leopold don’t – they inspire me to, but it’s cool to listen to what women are doing, their journeys, and how they’re affecting things that are happening. They’re not just sitting by; they’re on the park agency committee or a land trust committee. When we work together with everybody in diversity across the board, we all win.”

Nature offers a wonderful path toward more sustainable living. There is a tremendous amount of free information from naturalists like Dwyer, who are eager to share what they know. And there are inspiring online communities like One Planet Life and other apps. 

“There are more ways than ever to educate and inform people about what is happening in our natural world, share that, and hopefully inspire others to go out and observe – maybe use iNaturalist or eBird, one of these apps. They can easily become citizen scientists, helping with climate change or bird migration.”

Committing to a Natural (and Local) Lifestyle

When Dwyer had her first child over 30 years ago, she focused on providing as much natural sustenance for her family as possible. 

“We ate naturally. Our water was filtered, and I grew my own vegetables,” said Dwyer. “One of the reasons why it became important to grow my own vegetables is because the baby food company we bought our food from had glass in it. So I grew the vegetables, pureed them, put them in little ice cube trays, and froze them. That spurred my love for gardening.”

She remembered the guidance her grandmother offered as well. 

“My grandmother was a big inspiration for my cooking,” she shared. “She told me, ‘When you get married, you never feed your family from a box.’ I never did.” 

The One Planet Life Team
What she couldn’t grow on her own, Dwyer sourced as much as she could from local farmers.

“I think what started me on my journey shopping locally is that my oldest son was diagnosed with leukemia when he was three and a half,” she shared. “At the time, commercial farmers were putting in antibiotics and growth hormones. I wasn’t aware of what was being injected into our animals and how that would have an effect. So I found a farm near us.” 

Shopping for pasture-raised meat, eggs, and dairy at a little farm store provided Dywer with transparency and freshness not often available at the supermarket. 

“Our country exists on small businesses,” she said. “If we don’t protect small businesses, we are going to be locked down with the big businesses, their costs, and all the things that go along with it – our selection of choices may be lowered, protection for our workers, our natural resources. We can’t have a monopoly. We need to protect our small business owners to help preserve them.” 

Joining Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs), shopping for what is currently in season, and learning ways to preserve fresh food at home through freezing and canning are great ways to lower your carbon footprint when it comes to eating sustainably.

“I try to encourage people to join CSAs because you’re not only helping the farmer, you are also saving money in the end,” Dwyer said. “If you go to your local farmer or CSA, you won’t pay as much as you do in the big box grocery stores. It’s going to be fresher because it came from right here.”

She tries to encourage others by giving them samples to try. Once tasting the difference in freshness, it’s easy to make the switch to local.

“If you’re buying in season, you’ll be getting the freshest food,” she added. “It can be sustained if you buy extra, put it in your freezer, or make a soup out of it, put it in your freezer, and you can have it during the winter months when produce selection is a little bit lower.”

And the best part of it all?

“It’s relationship building,” Dwyer said. “You never know who you’ll meet at one of these little places that might become your best friend, someone to walk with. There are a lot of people from COVID who are still wary of going to these big box stores. You go into smaller businesses and somehow feel a little bit safer. You feel a little bit more welcome.”

Through a lifetime love affair with the outdoors, a keen interest in learning about the natural world, and dedication to providing her family with fresh, natural meals, Dwyer’s sustainability journey has been decades in the making.

“All the things that I do, it’s natural,” she said. “It’s not something I have to force.”

And that mentality shouldn’t seem so difficult – returning to our roots. After all, our climate crisis has only been accelerating within the past few decades. If we all make an effort to support our local food chain, consume the plethora of free resources available from experts, and revel in the wonder of the outdoors, a sustainable lifestyle could quickly become “natural” for all of us.

 You can read more about Yvonne’s Sustainability Journey here:

My Journey to Reduce My Carbon Footprint Started With Trash

An Easy Guide to Backyard Composting

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and REFILL to Benefit the Planet

The staff at One Planet Life are serious about sustainable living. That’s why we decided to share the struggles and successes of our individual sustainability journeys. We will share tips directly from our team members, curated through authentic personal experience. We hope that by sharing our stories, we can help foster a community committed to helping each other – and the planet!

Read about One Planet Life Founder Lorie Buckingham’s sustainability Journey.

Make Simple Changes to Drastically Cut Waste Generated in Your Kitchen

Make Simple Changes to Drastically Cut Waste Generated in Your Kitchen

Put Eco-friendly Alternatives to Work for You to Cut Waste in Your Kitchen.

Do you find yourself pulling several paper towels off the roll for every mess? How about reaching for single-use plastics like water bottles and plastic wrap more often than not? Is your trash overflowing with smelly food scraps? You’re not alone. Thankfully, there are many ways to reduce the amount of waste in your kitchen.

Explore the Eco-Friendly Alternatives. 

Did you know that the average American uses seven trees a year in paper, wood, and other products made from trees? This amounts to about two billion trees per year, according to data from Middle Georgia University. The amount of wood and paper we throw away each year would be enough to heat 50 million homes for 20 years.

Paper towels are a huge source of unnecessary waste that falls into that category. Americans use 13 billion pounds of paper towels a year, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It’s not surprising when you consider families go through an average of nearly two rolls a week. A whopping 110 million trees are downed annually to produce paper towels alone.

Thankfully, there are many eco-friendly alternatives to help clean up messes in the kitchen and beyond.

Cloth towel rolls, often made of flannel or cotton to easily stick together and include a simple stitch along the edges to prevent fraying, are super easy to make for the novice seamstress. If sewing isn’t your thing, we recommend the ones pictured here from Cheeks Ahoy.  A quick search on Etsy can deliver plenty of variations to choose from – plus, you’re supporting a small business!  

Cheeks Ahoy Unpaper Towels
Swedish Dishcloths have taken the sustainability world by storm.

By adding a few of these absorbent little squares to my kitchen, I’ve been able to nearly cut paper towels out of my life. They are super absorbent, compact to store, and easy to keep clean for everyday use. 

“Invented by a Swedish engineer in 1949, the rags are made of 100 percent naturally biodegradable cellulose or a combination of wood pulp and renewable cotton,” writer Ashlea Halpern noted. “They are superabsorbent, able to soak up 20 times their own weight in liquid. They are soft and pliable when wet but dry quickly in between uses.”

Looking for a cheap and simple solution to replace old paper towels? Cut your old bath towels and cotton t-shirts into squares. Not only will you be giving this fabric a second life, but well-used cotton is ultra absorbent! This is a completely cost-free solution you can implement immediately. 

Still not sure if this Joyful Change will make an impact? Think again. If each American household swapped just one roll of paper towels for a recycled version, nearly 54,000 trees could be saved each year!

Plastic wrap is another culprit for unnecessary trash in the kitchen.

That sticky, flimsy plastic cannot be recycled because it contains PVC. Considering that 5.3 million Americans used ten or more rolls of plastic wrap in 2020 alone, landfills are filling up fast. When sent to the dump, plastic cling film can take about 450 years to decompose. That’s where beeswax wraps can save the day. Instead of breaking out the roll of harmful, single-use plastic, invest in a few different sizes of beeswax wraps – fabric squares, often organic cotton, coated in naturally produced beeswax that you can rinse off and use over and over again. 

Speaking of flimsy plastic, we all know how intrusive plastic grocery store bags have become in the environment.

Make the switch to a canvas tote or foldable tote bag instead. Stash one in your car, purse, or backpack so you always have one available for those spur-of-the-moment stops at the local grocery store or farmer’s market. Do you have some flimsy bags tucked in a drawer at home? Do some research on where you can take these to recycle since most curbside recycling can’t utilize them. A lot of grocery stores have drop-off bins available for these items.

Canvas Tote Bags
Do you find yourself packing plastic water bottles and single-use cutlery into your family’s lunches?

These items are notorious for overloading landfills and aren’t easily recycled. Instead, opt for a water filtration system and encourage reusable water bottles in your household. Filtration systems give you that same fresh taste, and reusable bottles will often keep water cold for much longer. To cut down on single-use cutlery, try substituting a washable set, like the pouch sets we have available in our eco-store.              

Give Composting a Try.

We’re all trying our best to combat the food waste problem. However, we inevitably end up with bits and pieces of food that get tossed into the trash can – potato peels, coffee grounds, or the moldy cucumber that never made it to our lunchtime salad. Before you toss this waste into the trash can, consider composting it. 

What exactly is composting? According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, composting entails the following:

“A controlled, aerobic (oxygen-required) process that converts organic materials into a nutrient-rich soil amendment or mulch through natural decomposition. The end product is compost – a dark, crumbly, earthy-smelling material. Microorganisms feed on the materials added to the compost pile during the composting process. They use carbon and nitrogen to grow and reproduce, water to digest materials, and oxygen to breathe.”

By composting anything from kitchen scraps to yard trimmings, you are implementing a resourceful habit of managing waste in a more sustainable way. All you need to get started is a compost bin in your kitchen. In no time, you’ll be able to generate free, high-quality soil for your houseplants or garden.

If you have space to set up a compost pit in your backyard, be sure to allow for enough room to turn over your compost regularly for even decomposition. If you live in an urban area, check out our map of curated composting services nationwide to get started.  

Composting is an easy and rewarding sustainable practice; you’ll wonder why you didn’t start sooner!

Pro Tip: Add some earthworms to your compost pit, “Vermicomposting,” to help speed up the decomposition process!

Save electricity in your kitchen.

In the market for a new kitchen appliance? Look for the blue “Energy Star” designation for energy-efficient models. The United States Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency has even teamed up to create a free online resource to search for efficient models. 

If your refrigerator is over 15 years old, consider looking for a new one. It’s likely using twice the amount of energy than a new Energy Star certified model! Make sure to recycle your old one, too; by properly recycling your old refrigerator and replacing it with a new Energy Star-certified version, you can save more than $260 over the 12-year lifetime of the product. 

Dishwashers are another appliance worth upgrading in your kitchen. A standard-sized Energy Star certified dishwasher costs about $35 per year to run and can save you about 3,800 gallons of water over its lifetime. 

In 2020 alone, Energy Star certified appliances helped save more than 520 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity and avoid $42 billion in energy costs. These savings resulted in associated emission reductions of more than 400 million metric tons of greenhouse gasses, roughly equivalent to more than 5% of U.S. total greenhouse gas emissions. 

Food production constitutes 8-16% of the total national energy consumption in the US, according to the Yale Environmental Review. Cooking accounts for 20% of consumers’ energy use. Refrigeration and dishwashing evenly split the remaining energy demand.

Is a gas or electric oven more efficient? The typical gas stove in America is only 40% efficient, whereas its electric counterpart is 80%, according to a 2013 study, “Review Energy consumption during cooking in the residential sector of developed nations: A review.  However, when you take a more holistic view of how each form of energy is generated, researchers determined that electric stoves powered with gas are the more efficient choice by approximately 20%. 

Cooking methods can affect the amount of energy we use in the kitchen. Curious as to whether specialty appliances, like rice cookers and electric kettles, are more efficient? Most studies determined that these specialty appliances are more efficient than ovens and stovetops.

“The microwave showed trends that were less clear, but seems to emerge victorious for small portions and foods with short cook times,” the Yale Environmental Review reported.  

Simple practices, such as cooking in large batches, putting a lid on a pot during cooking, and cooking food in full pots, are easy habits that can make a big difference in cutting energy waste in the kitchen.

The Energy Saving Trust recommends a few additional tips to implement when preparing meals:

  • Only use as much water as you need – boiling extra takes more time and energy.
  • Always cover your pots and pans – the water will boil faster and use less energy to heat your food.
  • Turn off the heat a couple of minutes before your food is fully cooked – particularly if you’ve got an electric hob, as they take some time to cool down and will continue to cook your food.
  • Don’t open the oven door repeatedly – you’ll let out hot air and waste energy. If you can, take a look through the glass door instead.

These tips are just a few simple ways your family can contribute to creating a more sustainable space. With a room as versatile as the kitchen, the possibilities are truly endless. Be sure to track and measure your efforts to reduce waste in your kitchen. Get the One Planet Life app and select the Reduce Waste Journey.

Written by Carley Kimball

Written by Carley Kimball

Freelance Journalist and OPL Content Contributor

“I’ve always tried to implement planet-friendly practices in my life but didn’t quite realize just how much of an impact individuals can make until I was introduced to One Planet Life. I’m so excited to be able to utilize my professional skills to contribute valuable information and positive personal experiences to help make the world a better place.”

New Year, New You, Renewed Planet: One Planet Life Can Help You Live Sustainably

New Year, New You, Renewed Planet: One Planet Life Can Help You Live Sustainably

Resolve to Live Sustainably in 2023 and Track Joyful Changes in the One Planet Life App

New Year’s Resolutions can be tough. Establishing new habits often comes with a mountain of challenges, which can derail your goals for the upcoming year. It’s more important now than ever to shrink our collective carbon footprint and stay on track with our individual sustainability goals. The right knowledge and tools to support our efforts can make all the difference. How can we possibly stay motivated to turn new habits into regular routines when life gets busy? One Planet Life has the perfect tool for you.

The One Planet Life App, first launched last February, has grown into a wonderful community of like-minded goal-setters that support each other to make lifestyle changes that positively impact the planet.

In a study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, How are habits formed: Modeling habit formation in the real world, researchers found that, on average, it takes more than two months (66 days) before a new behavior becomes second nature. Setting goals, tracking progress in real-time and having a community to share tips and struggles can help habits stick.

One Planet Life helps people track their sustainability goals in a familiar way, like tracking progress on a fitness app. 

Users can set goals for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and celebrate everyday victories. With the Life Center Sustainable Living Dashboard, you can easily see just how much of an impact your Joyful Changes are making, and the pounds of CO2 emissions you are saving through each action. App users can also earn Planet Points, and stay motivated by seeing just how much of a difference their active changes make as they add up throughout the year. 

One  Planet Life App

One of the greatest aspects of the app is the community within it. Users communicate with others working through similar eco-journeys, offer tips, compete in challenges, share recipes, and more! The focused social platform makes it easy to stay motivated by sharing in each other’s sustainability goal achievements.

Knowledge is Power

The idea for One Planet Life has been over two decades in the making. Founder Lorie Buckingham was first inspired to create a platform like One Planet Life because she struggled to find accurate information about our individual impacts on the environment.

“There was an obtuseness to information and lots of dubious information to drive purchases,” she shared. “I was asking simple questions: ‘Where was this tomato grown? What chemicals were sprayed on it?’ It was almost impossible to get any information.”

One of One Planet Life’s best features is an active blog accessible online or through the app. Our team works hard to sort through the overwhelming amount of information online to bring accurate, peer-reviewed, relevant content to help our community succeed along their eco-journeys.

“The journey for information continued because knowledge is power,” Buckingham said. “Over time, I began to work to reduce my carbon footprint. Starting small, I have been decreasing it more each year. I continue to work on my journey to live a sustainable lifestyle.”

Jump into Eco-Journeys to Maximize Impact

Not sure where to start? One Planet Life has established six unique journeys that come with their own series of Joyful Changes, focusing on different types of sustainability goals. If these journeys don’t work for you, you can also customize your own path by choosing from 121 different Joyful Changes to pursue. Once you master a Joyful Change, you can then turn it into a Lifestyle Habit.

GREEN NEST Journey

The Green Nest Journey focuses specifically on changes you can make around your home to reduce waste, energy, water, and more. Through this journey, you can make the largest impact and cut 1 ton, 1,405 lbs of carbon emissions per year.

Here are the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward:

  • Changing your thermostat one degree daily
  • Replace one incandescent lightbulb with an LED lightbulb once per quarter
  • Turn off electronics when not in use daily

CO2 Reduced: 1 ton, 1,405 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 37,550 
Duration: 12 Months

One Planet Life Green Nest Journey App Screen
One Planet Life Travel Lite Journey
TRAVEL LITE Journey

This journey is perfect for the frequent traveler! It’s no secret that traveling can really add up when it comes to carbon emissions. On average, carbon emissions can total over 500 lbs per passenger, per hour of flight in a Boeing 737 or Boeing 747, Carbon Independent estimates. Choosing first class adds even more emissions, according to a 2020 study by the International Council on Clean Transportation. 

Through this journey, your goals can add up to saving 1 ton, 492 lbs of carbon emissions per year. However, by implementing additional changes, like choosing drivable travel destinations and dropping flights altogether, you can make an even larger impact! 

Here’s a sneak peek of the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward: 

  • Downshift from a flight to a drive for your next vacation
  • Bring reusable containers on your trip
  • Dine at a local restaurant on your trip

CO2 Reduced: 1 ton, 492 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 23,560 
Duration: 12 Months

REDUCE WASTE Journey

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle! By giving everyday items a second life, you are cutting down on the amount of waste that ends up in a landfill. This eco-journey helps you change your mindset in everyday situations that add up quickly. You can cut 1 ton 66 lbs of carbon emissions per year through this eco-journey.

Here’s a sneak peek of the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward: 

  • Use a reusable water bottle daily
  • Use reusable shopping bags four times per month
  • Buy recycled or secondhand products

CO2 Reduced: 1 ton, 66 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 65,005 
Duration: 12 Months

One Planet Life Reduce Waste Journey
One Planet Life Plastic Be Gone Journey
PLASTIC BE GONE Journey

We all know that plastic has become a major environmental issue. By choosing to replace single-use plastics with reusable options, carbon emission savings quickly add up! You’ll save 1,078 lbs of carbon emissions per year by choosing this eco-journey.

Here’s a sneak peek of the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward: 

  • Buy dry goods in bulk every week
  • Refuse disposable to-go items every week
  • Buy package-less produce

CO2 Reduced: 1,078 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 32,355 
Duration: 12 Months

PLANETARY SAMPLER Journey

This eco-journey is a great mix of several different types of Joyful Changes that allow you to make an impact across different aspects of your life. Cut 1,513 lbs of carbon per year off of your footprint by choosing this eco-journey.

Here’s a sneak peek of the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward: 

  • Buy in-season produce at your local farmer’s market once per quarter
  • Take a walk in nature twice per month
  • Swap paper towels for cloth napkins and dish towels daily

CO2 Reduced: 1,513 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 31,995 
Duration: 12 Months

One Planet Life Planetary Sampler Journey
One Planet Life Focus on Food Journey
FOCUS ON FOOD Journey

Buying locally grown ingredients, eating what’s currently in season, and cutting down meat consumption are all great food-related ways to shrink your carbon footprint. Learning the ins and outs of composting can drastically cut down on the amount of waste you send to the landfill each week. In this eco-journey, you can look forward to saving 1,709 lbs of carbon emissions per year.

Here’s a sneak peek of the Joyful Changes you’ll work toward: 

  • Eat a vegetarian meal three times per week
  • Swap beef with chicken once per week
  • Start composting weekly

CO2 Reduced: 1,709 lbs
Planet Points Earned: 39,945 
Duration: 12 Months

We know New Year’s Resolutions are challenging. But with the One Planet Life App and the supportive, like-minded community that comes with it, we can help each other mold sustainability goals into habits – and save a whole lot of carbon in the process!

Struggling to stay motivated? Sign up for App Notifications!

  • Get your daily dose of inspiration from the OPL team.
  • Get a reminder to track your joyful changes.
  • Celebrate your achievements with our progress reports.
  • Get a reminder to complete your challenges.
  • We are on this journey with you. We are in this together.
  • Our entire team is committed to helping you succeed. Download the newest update or join us for the first time today. We look forward to meeting you.
Written by Carley Kimball

Written by Carley Kimball

Freelance Journalist and OPL Content Contributor

“I’ve always tried to implement planet-friendly practices in my life but didn’t quite realize just how much of an impact individuals can make until I was introduced to One Planet Life. I’m so excited to be able to utilize my professional skills to contribute valuable information and positive personal experiences to help make the world a better place.”

New Year | New You 15-Day Sustainability Kickstart Challenge

New Year | New You 15-Day Sustainability Kickstart Challenge

The second half of January is a great time to start a 15-day sustainability kickstart challenge now that the holidays are over and we are focused on the year ahead. 

Consider it a warmup to a year of joyful changes that benefit you and the planet. Lowering your impact on the planet isn’t difficult once you set your mind to it and begin to take daily action. Sometimes, the most challenging part is knowing what actions make the most difference and which of those actions are manageable within your lifestyle. That’s where we come in!

We have created a fun and accessible challenge for you. 

Over the next 15 days, January 17-31, 2023, you will reduce your carbon footprint, make fewer trips to the store, reduce waste, and save money. And, even better, when you combine your success with everyone else participating in the challenge, those sustainability wins add up!

To kick things off on Day 1, try using your reusable water bottle or coffee cup instead of single-use plastic throughout your day. Americans use and throw away up to 4 single-use beverage containers daily. If you keep up this pretty doable action, you could reduce your carbon emissions by 231 metric pounds and reduce your single-use plastic waste by 720 bottles or more this year. Now this is the type of slimming down that benefits you and the planet. Your cheering section just grew louder.

Here is the calendar of joyful changes to make during this challenge.
January 15-day Sustainability Challenge Calendar
Tracking your actions is as important as taking action.

If you haven’t yet, be sure to download our free app and use it to track your impact during this challenge. If you are already using the One Planet Life app, you can follow your current journey during this challenge and track any joyful change each day.  The goal of the challenge is to take daily action and track it to build lifelong habits toward more sustainable living,

Chocolate Chip and Coffee Biscotti

Chocolate Chip and Coffee Biscotti

If you have any coffee lovers in your circle, this chocolate chip and coffee biscotti is a great go-to cookie for just about any activity.  Whether sitting on the patio or by the fireside with a good book and a hot drink, you will enjoy this crunchy, semi-sweet biscotti.

Recipe adapted from the Dirty Gourmet.

Servings:  Makes about 20 -24 cookies

Ingredients:

  • 2- 3/4 cup King Arthur’s all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tsps. baking powder
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsps. finely ground dark roast coffee
  • 1 cup mini chocolate chips
  • 2 tbsps. unsalted butter 
  • 2 tsps. vanilla extract
  • 3 large eggs
Dark Roast Coffee Grounds
Chocolate Chips
Instructions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, or a silicon mat, or coat with baking spray.
  2. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, ground coffee, and chocolate chips in a mixing bowl.
  3. In a separate large bowl, combine oil, vanilla, and eggs.
  4. Add dry ingredients to wet ingredients and stir until well blended.  The dough will be quite dry.  With your hands, knead the dough just until it comes together.   
  5. Divide the dough in half and shape each portion into a log, about 8 inches long, flattening the log to about 1 inch thick.  Place the logs several inches apart on the prepared baking sheet.
  6. Bake for 35 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees F.  Remove the logs from the baking sheet and cool for about 5 minutes.  Brush the logs lightly with water and let them cool for another 5 minutes.
  7. On a cutting board, with a serrated knife, cut the biscotti into 3/4-inch slices.  Arrange the slices, cut-side down on the baking sheet, and bake for 10 minutes.  Turn the slices over, and bake for another 10 minutes.  Remove from the oven and let cool. The biscotti will be slightly soft until they cool completely.
Chef Yvonne Dwyer

Recipe compliments of OPL Master Naturalist and Home Chef Yvonne Dwyer

OPL Plant-rich Recipes

Eating more fruits and vegetables is good for you and the planet.  Find more delicious OPL-recommended plant-rich recipes here.

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